Forums

Topic: Finding the right TV for Xbox Series X

Posts 21 to 40 of 106

Nexozi

Thanks @ThanosReXXX and @BlueOcean 😁 @MaccaMUFC I spoke with Currys and they confirmed their care & and repair plan covers burn-in. They're also offering an LG SL9YG sound bar for 1/2 price with the C9.

Nexozi

MaccaMUFC

@ThanosReXXX @BlueOcean @Nexozi

Thanks for the info about the C9 and the YouTube videos about it’s features. I’m 100% committed to going with the C9 now, it’s reassuring that it has measures in place to prevent burn-in like the screen dimming when not in use after a minute and I’ll be making sure to turn the brightness right down when watching channels with logos on the top corner of the screen but don’t know if games with static HUDs will be a problem?

Like Nexozi I’ll most likely be getting mine from Curry’s too and will inquire about the extended warranty if it covers burn-in. I’ve got home content insurance too which covers accidental damage.

The wife took some persuading seeing as she wanted at least a 65” and saw a 75” for a grand but had to explain that those TVs are not top of the range and don’t compare to the C9’s picture quality. I’m just having to explain how we need to look after it and not to pause Corrie for hours while on the phone.

MaccaMUFC

ThanosReXXX

@Nexozi @MaccaMUFC You're both welcome. If I'm not mistaken, there's options built-in to the latest version of the C9, to prevent and/or minimize burn-in, and of course, there's some settings you could alter. @BlueOcean could probably tell you more about that.

Here's some more info on the topic:
https://www.avforums.com/threads/screen-burn-on-lg-c9.2275544/
(on a side note: AV Forums is a good place for audio or video device related questions in general, because there's also a lot of members that are professional testers and technicians on there)

Edited on by ThanosReXXX

'The console wars are like boobs. Sony and Microsoft fight over which ones look the nicest and Nintendo's are the most fun to play with.'

Xbox Gamertag: ThanosReXXX

MaccaMUFC

I’ve changed my mind yet again. I realise this is getting ridiculous and wouldn’t blame anyone being fed up with me going back and forth because I’m fed up myself.

So I did some thinking about what content I’d be using the TV for and how often it’ll be used during the day and night and I honestly think the C9 wouldn’t be the best idea. I’ll be using the TV primarily for gaming and watching sports, other times it’ll be for general tv viewing like soaps for the missus and Netflix now and again. I’ll be using it mostly in a bright room during the day and a few hours during the night.

The Q75T is off the table, it’s the Q90R I’m going for now, it’s Samsung’s flagship QLED from last year but doing some research it’s still regarded as one of, if not the best LED LCD TV on the market and even better than most of the 2020 QLEDs. Even though it officially doesn’t have a recognised HDMI 2.1 port, it is capable of doing 4K @120fps and has VRR and FreeSync. The Q90R is also comparable to the C9 which is saying something. I don’t watch a lot of movies and I think that’s where the C9 excels at most and it’s best viewed in a dark room but like I said I’ll only be taking advantage of that for just a few hours a night.

I was looking forward to playing games like Everspace, Elite Dangerous and Batman Arkham Knight on the C9 to see what a difference the black levels will be like.

I appreciate that some of you guys provided info on the C9 and I was very much leaning towards it but when I’ll be using the TV mostly in a bright room during the day and that I watch a lot of sports, I know it’s better to have the Q90R for its brightness and having no risk of burn-in is one less thing to worry about.

Edited on by MaccaMUFC

MaccaMUFC

ThanosReXXX

@MaccaMUFC Well, ultimately, it's your choice and it's your money, so if you want to buy a Samsung screen that's up to you. That last video I posted, though, should have taken away any worries about burn-in on the C9, and for gaming there simply is no better TV than the C9. Multiple tests have shown and proven this. You've confused the better blacks it has to be better for movies, but it's actually for gaming.

I have a feeling that you've been focusing too much on the brightness thing, which is only a minor aspect, and perhaps you've also been led too much by that video of "unknown YouTuber #1,398.459" in comment #8, which might have made you kind of blind towards the far greater benefits that LG screens offer vs Samsung screens, ESPECIALLY for gaming, such as reaction time, the aforementioned better blacks AND better viewing angles (which also completely nullifies the "better for daylight" idea).

Oh, well. As I said: it's ultimately up to you, and you have to pay for it and use it, but I know what my choice would have been...

Edited on by ThanosReXXX

'The console wars are like boobs. Sony and Microsoft fight over which ones look the nicest and Nintendo's are the most fun to play with.'

Xbox Gamertag: ThanosReXXX

BlueOcean

@MaccaMUFC No problem, it's up to you what TV you get but I just want to confirm that "if the wife pauses Corrie", the panel turns off automatically and she'll see a fireworks screensaver and if you play a game or watch channels with static logos or HUDs they are dimmed automatically.

@Nexozi That's great.

BlueOcean

MaccaMUFC

@ThanosReXXX @BlueOcean I know the C9 would be the best option for gaming and that’s exactly why I’d consider it for gaming alone but the fact I’ll be viewing it in a bright room most of the time and that I’ll be watching sports a lot which will have bright static logos on the screen for hours as well as games with HUDs, even when dimmed automatically you’d still pick the C9?

Believe me when I say I want the C9 over any other tv (I want the best tv for gaming first and foremost) but given my situation with bright room viewing and many daily hours of general tv and sport channels, on top of gaming, I just worry that I’m going to wear the tv out quickly and constantly checking for burn-in, especially after watching sport programmes over the weekends. The C9 is only a year old, isn’t it possible that problems could start arising in another year or two? I’d be happy if it lasted at least a few years. It just the sport channels and the many hours the tv would be used each day that’s holding me back from the C9 atm.

Edited on by MaccaMUFC

MaccaMUFC

BlueOcean

@MaccaMUFC I had my doubts too but after reading the forums I made my decision. The C9 is a recent TV but most C7 (2017) owners are still happy. I don't know how long my C9 (2019) is going to last (ask me in five years and I'll tell you if it still works fine) but the picture is the best I've seen and its power consumption is more efficient because it's OLED. HDMI 2.1 was a big reason for me as a gamer but the overall quality is better than I expected and that includes not just black but all colours, contrast, HDR, etc. I re-played all the main Resident Evil games on it and it was incredible seeing those games in a new light, literally. I would never change that for a LED/QLED TV, no matter what Samsung says.

Edited on by BlueOcean

BlueOcean

BAMozzy

Its not about Burn in with OLEDs - and companies have done a great job of minimising the risk. The problem is the individual sub-pixels that are used to create the image. As you know, a TV has 3 main colours, Red, Green and Blue and each pixel is made up of these 'tiny' sub-pixels that illuminate to create the gamut of colours we see. Each OLED sub-pixel has a 'life span' and, unlike LEDs, fade gradually over time with use. Therefore if a certain portion of the screen is displaying a bright red logo for example, all that brightness has to come from just 1 sub-pixel and it has to be on for however long that logo is displayed. The red subpixels over the rest of the screen are constantly varying their brightness, often off and rarely, if ever, on as brightly as the ones displaying that logo so over time, those that are used to display the logo will fade more than the rest - causing a 'darker' patch on the Red slide. It may not be noticeable in general content because the image is moving and changing colours - you won't notice that slightly less red in that area at all. In fact someone didn't notice any damage from watching Sky-sports news until they played Spider-Man and noticed a 'darker' bar on the screen which was meant to be a solid red background.

That person only watched Sky Sports on the weekend for a few hours whilst the football was on but that was enough to wear those red sub-pixels enough to dim more than the rest - despite having all the burn-in protection and ensuring the Screen Wash programme was on to. He was a heavy user - over 4000 hours in under 2yrs. Someone else could own the same TV, only have 2000 hours and not have any issue, have 4000 hours but don't watch anything with static elements (a Ticker Tape news bar isn't static as such because it has scrolling text but the box is fixed on screen) etc so again not see any signs of uneven wear.

The fact that a TV is 2yrs old or has the same number of hours of usage does not mean that the wear they have is 'indicative' of EVERY person. Its very dependent on WHAT you view and the amount of hours certain content is being displayed, especially its colour, whether you have the TV set brighter or not in general and the frequency you display those static elements. Someone could watch 1hr of GMB every morning for 2yrs and end up with a noticeable issue, but another person may watch it occasionally for 2yrs, at a dimmer setting and still have no noticeable issue at all and another person may have more hours of general content usage and have no noticeable issue - it doesn't mean that 1 person with an issue is 'unlucky' or 'wrong' to say there is an issue with uneven wear, just like those people with no issue are lucky or right to say that these TV's are 'safe'. They may well be 'safe' with the type of content they view with the settings they have and hours viewed so far but doesn't mean uneven wear isn't going to rear its head sooner or later. That person who continues to watch GMB will cause more and more wear accumulatively to the sub-pixels where the static elements are until eventually they fade enough to become noticeably dimmer than the rest.

The point I am making here is that just because the technology has worked for you so far, without any noticeable deterioration as all organic compounds will do eventually, doesn't mean it won't happen to another if they use their TV more or display certain content more. I am not trying to put people off of buying an OLED at all but to make people aware so they choose the TV that suits them best. On AV Forums, there is a Poll for people to vote about whether or not they have had 'burn-in' (although its all uneven wear really when you hear about the issue and what has 'burned in') and the 2016 TV's are incredibly high % of voters - 106 out of 290 voters with burn in, 45 out of 283 for 2017 OLED users and 10 out of 171 2018 OLED owners. As its 'wear' and based on hours of viewing certain content that causes this, you would expect newer TV's to have much lower accumulated wear so less chance of issues. I know its just a snapshot too and possibly a little skewed as some may vote because they have issues but others may vote because they haven't noticed issues as they don't check slides or colour balance.

Again - not trying to put people off because if your viewing habits are such, you could easily get MANY years of excellent Picture Quality - even HDR which does have its limitations with OLED, (full screen or even half screen brightness, less saturated bright colours due to 'boosting' the brightness with white sub-pixels but of course they don't suffer from Local Dimming issues and/or light bloom/haloing) especially in bright rooms so it may well be the perfect TV for them. However for others, LED's may well be the better technology - despite its flaws for them - with the content they display and expectation for their TV to last a certain time with 'heavy' usage, like to have it set 'bright' too because its on in a bright room a LOT.

I will never tell someone they 'should' buy OLED OR LED, and I would never tell someone they shouldn't either. Its their money and they are the ones who know what content they regularly consume, what expectation they have r.e. Life Expectancy for the money and whether the pros outweigh the cons on either technology. I am sure we ALL know that neither is perfect at all so its up to the individual to decide, based on their own usage, needs and expectations which will be the best for them right now.

As I said, IF I were to buy a TV today purely for Gaming and next gen in mind - nothing else considered - then I would buy the C9 or replacement CX. I am sure that the next 'year', maybe more would be absolutely incredible PQ, but with the amount of hours my TV is on, some of the content I normally watch - although Covid has changed my viewing habits right now - their would be a big risk that my TV would not last 6yrs - at least 3yrs as a main TV and then the remainder as a Bedroom TV due to uneven wear - not Burn in as I don't believe I watch anything long enough in one continuous sitting to suffer from image retention, let alone Burn In. I believe LG and others have done a LOT to significantly reduce that risk BUT they cannot stop uneven wear. They could extend the life span of those sub-pixels so they fade at a much slower rate and therefore would take much more accumulated use to wear significantly more than the others - but they cannot stop uneven wear. Its like having a tower block all fitted with exactly the same lightbulbs, all brand new at the same time, all with a dimmer switch. Those rooms that use a lightbulb more and on the brightest option (like those sub-pixels illuminating a logo) will burn out long before those that barely get used (like sub-pixels under black bars if you watch mostly movies) and those that are not used a lot and when used are on dimly because other lights may help raise the brightness. They have a fixed life span and you can opt to burn through that quicker by leaving lights on fully for several hours a day or make it last longer by using it dimmed and for less hours everyday. If you like having your light on fully everyday for hours like watching content with static elements every day), then maybe its better to buy an LED bulb instead.

Its about picking what's right for you and what's right for you may not be the best option for another - especially in the 'long' term...

A pessimist is just an optimist with experience!

Why can't life be like gaming? Why can't I restart from an earlier checkpoint??

Feel free to add me but please send a message so I know where you know me from...

Xbox Gamertag: bamozzy

MaccaMUFC

@BlueOcean @BAMozzy I think I need to be asking someone who owns a C9 and watches the same amount of content, mainly gaming and sport channels, with many daily hours of usage. Channels like ITV, BBC and stuff wouldn’t bother me as we don’t watch morning news programmes like GMB, it’s usually soaps, the chase etc. But one thing I never mentioned is that subtitles is always on with everything we watch. It isn’t bad on Netflix as it’s just white text with no borders but on channels like BBC, ITV there’s black borders.

What if I turned the brightness right down when watching Sky Sports and other content that will have static logos? I suppose that could reduce the wear and when I’m gaming it’ll be automatically switched to Game Mode and all settings will be restored. Like Nexozi said Curry’s care and repair plan covers burn-in (not sure about faded pixels?) so say I start experiencing problems a year or 2 down the line I’ll have the option to get it fixed or even replaced.

Edited on by MaccaMUFC

MaccaMUFC

BlueOcean

@MaccaMUFC Black borders shouldn't worry you at all because on that area the OLED pixels are off. I didn't get the retailer's guarantee, I was confident about my purchase after reading comments from owners of older models like C8 and C7 (on avforums). The C9 is probably the best value so I wouldn't rule it off because of hypothetical issues, especially if you are getting additional guarantee.

I watch TV and play games on my C9, both activities show static logos/HUDs but the TV dims those areas automatically (you can choose between two levels). Settings are saved for each port and mode (SDR and HDR) automatically, you can copy settings too. If you watch TV you can use something like automatic or AI brightness or just turn brightness down. You don't need brightness higher than 50 on this TV (47 is the sweet spot for me). These are the settings I selected for gaming:

Picture (Game user):
OLED Light: 70-100 (100 for more vivid image)
Contrast: 85
Brightness: 50
HDR Brightness: 47 (Because if you select 50 black becomes dark grey in HDR, this was a huge discovery!)
Sharpness: 10
Colour: 55
Tint: 0

Expert controls:
Dynamic contrast: off
Super resolution: off
Colour gamut: auto
Gamma: 2.2
White balance:
Colour temperature: medium
Method: 2 points
Point: high
Red: 0
Green: 0
Blue: 0

Colour management system:
Colour: red
Saturation: 0
Tint: 0
Luminance: 0
Peak brightness: off

Picture options:
Noise reduction: off
MPEG noise reduction: off
Smooth gradation: off
Black level: low for SDR; high for HDR (another important finding!)
Real cinema: off
Motion eye care: off
TruMotion: off
Energy saving: off

Additional settings:
Eye comfort mode: off
HDMI Ultra HD Colour: on
Instant game response: on

Edited on by BlueOcean

BlueOcean

MaccaMUFC

@BlueOcean Thanks I’ll be sure to check those settings out if I do get the C9. I’m surprised you set your black level at high for HDR, on my Samsung if it’s on high the blacks look grey but set on low the blacks look much better and darker. I know with Colour Temperature you got to sometimes mess around with it so you don’t get a blue tint on the cool setting and or a sepia-like filter look on the higher settings. And dynamic contrast set to off? Interesting...

When playing different games do you not find you have to mess around with the brightness (both normal and HDR) in the game’s options or do you just leave it at the default settings?

MaccaMUFC

BlueOcean

@MaccaMUFC Interesting questions. Regarding HDR, I found out that Black Level Low for SDR and High for HDR is optimal. Keep reading for more about that.

When playing different games do you not find you have to mess around with the brightness (both normal and HDR) in the game’s options or do you just leave it at the default settings?

No, I don't mess with brightness, I use 50 for watching TV and SDR games and 47 for HDR games. The good thing is that settings are automatically saved and loaded so if you launch an HDR game the TV will adjust settings automatically and that applies to SDR games on the same console as well (very useful for Black Level). Lately, I found out that 47 is good for SDR too so I might leave brightness at 47 on all modes. My biggest discovery was that 50 is too bright for HDR games because blacks become grey (with Black Level: High). Regarding in-game HDR setting, in other words, setting HDR brightness in games, I usually go for the widest range available (or brightest setting) because the TV isn't bright enough to wash colours out and OLED technology won't allow contrast to be worse because of bright areas but some games have weird HDR settings. Fortunately, they have a test image with a logo or something so you can choose what you think it's best. With these settings, I enjoy an impressive HDR and perfect black and contrast. Colours look vivid but not artificial like on a QLED Samsung TV. Some people prefer paler (or warmer or colder) colours but I chose to keep colours balanced and nice. I hope that this helps.

Edited on by BlueOcean

BlueOcean

ThanosReXXX

@MaccaMUFC Well, @BAMozzy makes some fair points. It all depends on what you watch, and as @BlueOcean mentioned, it also depends on the settings you've applied. Besides the obvious static logos, so-called burn-in issues have been all over the place, meaning they're often different for everyone, but they all put them on one heap as in "yup, I have burn-in".

And while it's true that the C9 is barely 2 years old, so no real issues are known yet, we can look at the previous models in the same line, so the B8 and the C8, and these are also still doing VERY well.

Normally, I'd say go to a brick and mortar store and see how these screens operate in well-lit environments, but seeing as many stores will probably not be open under the current circumstances, if any, that's going to prove a bit difficult, I suppose. Unless of course you're not in a hurry to buy that new TV, in which case I would definitely wait a bit until I could see and compare things with my own eyes.

We can all give you tips or advice, or show you videos, but ultimately, you need to see it for yourself.

On a side note: I wouldn't be too surprised about the difference in settings. Different brands of TVs don't always necessarily yield the same results when using the same or similar settings, so where on your TV you would have dynamic contrast on, it would be better to leave it switched off on other screens, and so on.

Edited on by ThanosReXXX

'The console wars are like boobs. Sony and Microsoft fight over which ones look the nicest and Nintendo's are the most fun to play with.'

Xbox Gamertag: ThanosReXXX

BAMozzy

Personally, if you are getting some warranty that covers you for the length of time you expect to own the TV at a minimum and covers 'Burn In', then I think its a no-brainer and eliminates one of the major 'risks'. Of course you can concentrate on other pro's and con's.

What the RTINGS real life test shows - ignoring the obvious CNN news stream - was that even with general usage, watching a channel that shows a mix of content at 200nits, that uneven wear can occur faintly after well over 5000hrs and even that was feint on magenta slide which makes the 'faded' red more obvious - whether you would notice in normal content or not, I don't know but to accumulate 5000 hours in 2yrs, you would need to watch TV for 7hrs a day every day. After 9000hrs its still not terrible but you can clearly see uniformity is affected - yet after 9000hours, CoD has had basically no impact (or minimal).

Personally, I think the general test is the more important one here as that is a range of different content and, in their test, red shows the fastest decay. F1, Sky Sports and Netflix for example have Red logos which would mean that the red sub-pixels in fixed areas are getting more accumulated wear than other areas. Watching 'Sport' and Playing Fifa for 5000+hrs has had an impact but realistically, its the general use. This test 'proves' that it isn't Burn In and Burn in isn't a risk because if it was, the static areas on Fifa, Sport or CoD would be visible on ALL slides having burned in BUT its only affecting certain slides. Its also consistently shown that the Red Sub-pixel in that year (not to say LG haven't improved the life span of red so it doesn't fade as fast) wears quicker/has a shorter life span. Again, if the Sub-pixels don't have an even life span, then it stands to reason they will wear faster leading to uneven wear at some point in the future and affect colour balance/accuracy - its just whether or not it happens within an acceptable time frame for you and that will depend on the amount of hours you watch and what you watch too - things with Static Red and to a lesser degree Yellow and Magenta (as both Yellow and Magenta use Red and 1 other Sub-pixel so still quite demanding) will cause you more problems sooner.

AGAIN - not trying to put anyone off - but its important to know what potential risks, what content could cause more issues sooner and a 'rough' idea of the amount of hours that even a general range of content at 200 nits could cause. If you only have 2yrs of cover and watch around 2400 hrs a year, maybe in year 3, you will start to see some uniformity issue on a magenta slide (if you look for it) and maybe by the end of year 3, you see it in general content and can't then un-see it. If you aren't covered by an extended warranty, you are out of pocket...

If you are covered for 5 or 6yrs, then it really doesn't matter at all and it makes no sense to dismiss buying an OLED on the grounds of uneven wear. I will say it again, you are extremely unlikely to cause Burn-in - but burn in is caused by having a static image on-screen, without turning off or changing channels for extended periods causing that 'image' to 'burn in' to the screen. If you watch SkySports news on a Saturday for 4hrs that won't cause Burn-in, and if you watch hours of content the rest of the week, turn on every anti-burn in measure but still watch SkySports news for 4hrs EVERY weekend, that Ticker tape will cause uneven wear because the sub-pixels illuminating that Ticker Tape will have accumulated a lot more wear and faded, used up more of their 'finite' life expectancy than the other Sub-pixels that have been used more dimly and even off depending on the colour they are expected to display.

That RTING's test also shows that if you watch the right content for 9000hrs+, you may not see any uneven wear and as ALL 6 TV's have varying degrees of unevenness, it also shows that just because one person may have 8000hrs of trouble free experience, doesn't mean that is the 'normal' and can categorically state that uneven wear doesn't exist so buy an OLED because its all LED fanatics bashing OLED. They could be lucky that the content they view hasn't caused any noticeable decline.

My whole point isn't to say OLEDs are Bad, nobody should buy - but to really consider your own viewing habits and decide if you are likely to be at a bigger risk due to the number of hours you watch or type of content you view. IF you are at a 'greater' risk, look to see whether or not you will be covered by any warranty and whether that warranty is actually worth it. 2yrs Burn In warranty may sound like a good thing but if you only watch 1250hrs a year, you probably won't get too many issues with general viewing in the first 4-5yrs - maybe more.

I don't want to be 'I told you so' in 3 or 4yrs time, because I hope this information helps people buy the right tech and/or make sure they have the right protection/warranty cover. I hope that those with OLEDs already take the information on board and make changes if necessary to minimise the risks of uneven wear and extend their enjoyment.

There isn't a better TV on the market for next gen gaming right now than LG's OLEDs, no better TV for all round general use in the here and now and arguably has some competition in HDR presentation - (although that does depend on what's more important - whether colour range (which HDR is all about - not just 'brightness' as some think) and getting closer to displaying content as it was mastered, having that extra brightness for more impact in bright rooms with maybe some crush due to local dimming and/or increased risk of bloom/haloing or is having pixel perfect image with a lot more tone mapping, some less saturated highlights and/or maybe loss of highlight detail with a much more aggressive ABL more important) but if you take out the risk of having to replace your OLED at a cost due to warranty cover, the LG OLEDs are definitely the best all round and gaming TV on the market. Despite me being at a very high risk of uneven wear and very likely to need a panel replacement within 5-6yrs, there is NO other TV I would buy right now. I would rather replace my TV in 2-3 yrs and have the Best gaming TV for my series X and PS5 - although I will miss the OCB of the Samsung - but I am NOT buying a TV that cannot have both next gen consoles connected simultaneously and the pixel response time of OLEDs cannot be beat. Despite knowing that, I still cannot recommend that people should buy an LG TV because it may NOT be the best option for them. Not without considering what they view, the number of hours their TV is on, the lifespan they expect and any warranty, its duration and what that actually covers....

I know I have gone on a LOT but I don't want people to think that they are 'safe' from Burn in, then wear out a section on their TV and find out they are not covered - when some careful consideration, maybe some changes in their viewing habits or ensuring they are covered for such eventuality or opting for something different would have been a better option for them. That is all I am trying to do here - save some heartache or get people to look beyond today, beyond that excellent PQ today and consider the long term...

Edited on by BAMozzy

A pessimist is just an optimist with experience!

Why can't life be like gaming? Why can't I restart from an earlier checkpoint??

Feel free to add me but please send a message so I know where you know me from...

Xbox Gamertag: bamozzy

BAMozzy

@MaccaMUFC asking someone with a C9 isn't likely to tell you anything - they really won't have accumulated enough hours of usage to have any detectable wear on slides. On the 2017 LG's, It took over 5000hrs to detect very faint fading of the Red on a Magenta slide - highly unlikely you would notice in general content unless you had a Magenta slide - even on the red, it was barely noticeable - could just be a fraction darker. 5000hrs would require a TV to have been on for 14hrs a day, every day for a whole year and then that still may not be enough unless the channel they watched may have had the sports score box in Red more often than the channel they used for this test - and assuming LG haven't improved the life span of Red too.

I know that's not helpful but its not like LG are particularly forthcoming about the amount of fading and of course the person you ask may not watch TV as bright as you do or the same higher risk content for the same number of hours a week as you. The only way someone will have the same experience will be if the watch the exact same content for the exact same amount of time at the same brightness as you and any variation could make a big difference over several years Just browsing Netflix for 1hr less a week will make a difference - that's 52hrs less wear a year and if its not as bright too, that will mean a lot less wear over the course of year too...

I think it makes more sense to understand what is a 'high' wear element on screen - a single colour (R, B, G) or maybe a 2 colour (C, M, Y) that is 'static' and how often you display that element. Can you reduce or even eliminate it? How many hours is your TV on a year? Maybe you don't want to reduce it but will a warranty cover it and is it worth looking around to see if you can find a warranty that will - even if you have to go elsewhere for that - is it worth the extra cost? If having an extended shop warranty is a lot, but doesn't cover it, is it even worth paying for or are you better off putting that money aside in case an issue does occur in ~3yrs. Is it worth going to a 65" now with that extra cost when you can save that money and see what is around in a few years time...

What is best for you, Can you, if necessary make changes to minimise risk? What cover can you get to protect you in the even of an issue IF it occurs and is it better to perhaps buy a 55" for now and get you own experience over time - maybe replace it in a few years - move that to the bedroom to replace the KS and upgrade again?

I really don't think there is a better TV on the market especially for next gen gaming - the issue is the long term and what that 'long' term means to you? Is 5yrs what you want/expect - then what can you do to minimise the risk to get to 5yrs OR do you need to make sure that you are fully covered in the event of uneven wear? Is 3yrs Long enough? Even if it gets to 3yrs relatively unscathed, your bedroom viewing habits - if you move it to there could see it through another 3yrs+ so what is the 'long' term for you and what can you do to help it reach that if you buy it and will you be properly covered if something does occur. If Curry's will replace the panel if it suffers from issues, then it almost negates that negative but you need to make sure its not just a 2yr plan or something in the small print.

Everyone will have a different experience and timescale so its really down to you to understand what are high risk elements and reduce/eliminate them and/or make sure you have appropriate cover for the lifespan of your ownership. Of course then you have to decide if its still the right TV for you and the family with the other considerations....

A pessimist is just an optimist with experience!

Why can't life be like gaming? Why can't I restart from an earlier checkpoint??

Feel free to add me but please send a message so I know where you know me from...

Xbox Gamertag: bamozzy

redd214

This thread was very useful, thanks to all who contributed! Got a great deal on a couple of C9's one new one manufacturer refurb. New game room is going to be awesome!

Thanks again for the info!

redd214

Nexozi

Got to thank everyone for all the input in this thread. I still haven't gotten the new TV. Still trying to finalise the layout of my office / gaming room. I'm def going for an OLED, as the Q90T has major issues in game mode. The LG CX 48" would be the easiest for the layout in the room. But a 55" would really separate the room and dominate the gaming space. LG C something is what I'm def going for. The larger C9 is cheaper than the CX 48". But the 48" CX is more likely to get freesync LFC than the C9 is. After the assassin's creed demo they made LFC is quite important. They decided to go for the ultimate settings instead of frame rate. Though we can't expect all games to do that.

Nexozi

MaccaMUFC

@redd214 @Nexozi Your both no doubt going for probably the best TV currently on the market especially for gaming but unfortunately I’m not brave enough to go for an OLED as it will be the main TV in the living room that the whole family will be using. If I were to get a TV for just myself then I’d get the C9 no question.

Right now though I’m looking at getting the Q90R, I’m happy with it only having one HDMI port that supports 4K/120Hz as I’m only looking to use it solely for the Series X, it has VRR free-sync and Direct Full Array with local dimming, although it’s blacks won’t match an OLED it’s not far off and won’t find any other LED TV with better blacks. Either way the Q90R is still going to be a considerable upgrade from my KS8000.

MaccaMUFC

Top

Please login or sign up to reply to this topic